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FSIN JOINT MEDIA RELEASE

FIRST NATIONS WILL RECEIVE COVID-19 VACCINES

 

 

FSIN JOINT MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.ca                                                                                                                                                  For immediate release: March 25th, 2021

 

FIRST NATIONS WILL RECEIVE COVID-19 VACCINES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) –The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive applauds the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, which will now be available to First Nations throughout Saskatchewan through a  joint memorandum between Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), Saskatchewan Ministry of Health and the Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority (NITHA). The vaccination program will provide direct allocation of the COVID-19 vaccines for an effective and culturally supportive vaccine campaign in First Nations communities.

“First Nations are in the highest risk category for the COVID-19 virus and our vaccinations should be top priority” says PAGC Grand Chief Brian Hardlotte. “This leverages existing First Nations vaccine distribution in Saskatchewan.   First Nations will receive 14 percent of the provincial Covid-19 vaccine dose allocations for distribution.”

“We’re happy to hear that our members will have access to the vaccine” says MLTC Tribal Chief Richard Ben.  “The COVID-19 variants are on the rise in Saskatchewan and have become a huge concern for our First Nation communities.  This will help ease some of the worries that our members currently face.”

“We’re breathing a sigh of relief with this announcement and welcome the news that all of our community members will have vaccines made available to them” says FSIN Vice-Chief David Pratt.  “This vaccine allocation will assist every First Nations member to the COVID-19 vaccine as they become eligible and that includes urban members as well.”

“We welcome the news that the COVID-19 vaccines will be allocated for First Nations, as we have a Treaty Right to Health through the Medicine Chest Clause” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “We have been advocating for First Nations to receive direct allocations of the COVID-19 vaccine. We will continue to strive for Treaty implementation during this world-wide pandemic, so that all First Nations are protected through the Famine and Pestilence Clause that is affirmed in our Treaties.”

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.ca                                                                                                                For immediate release: February , 23rd, 2021

 

FSIN PROVINVIAL PERMITS HAVE NO AUTHORITY ON

FIRST NATIONS LANDS 

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is calling on Baselode Energy Corporation to respect and honour Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s decision to cease and desist further resources exploration and vacate their lands.  A permit was issued by the Saskatchewan Government to Baselode on traditional lands that sit on the edge of the Athabascan Basin, which would interfere with the traditional practices of the Birch Narrows Dene Nation.  It is also home to the world’s richest uranium deposits.  

 

“Resource developers must understand that provincial permits don’t give them the green light to run rough shot over our Inherent and Treaty Rights” says Birch Narrows Dene Nation Chief Jonathan Sylvestre.  “First Nations must be meaningfully and properly engaged on issues that have the potential to adversely impact our rights.  It’s been especially difficult to meet deadlines during COVID- 19, while our efforts are keeping our communities safe – not on rubber stamping resource development activities in our territories.”

 

Birch Narrows Dene Nation initially set up a blockade but took it down and is now patrolling the area regularly.  The Nation expects meaningful and proper consultation prior to any resource development or extraction on their Treaty and traditional lands.

 

“The province needs to provide the already underfunded First Nations with the financial resources to be able to participate at the table in a meaningful way” said Meadow Lake Tribal Council Tribal Chief Richard Ben. “Otherwise, many First Nations will be left out of the process. We can’t undertake studies at our own expense in order to be consulted on resource development within our territory.”

 

“These kinds of bad business practices won’t be tolerated anymore as our connections to the land, water, animals and environment is paramount” says FSIN Vice Chief Heather Bear. “Resource exploration and extraction within our territories presents our Treaty hunters and gatherers with real problems, especially when it impacts their ability to exercise their Inherent and Treaty rights to hunt, fish, trap and gather.”

 

“This is Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s traditional land. Their Inherent and Treaty Rights override the provincial permitting process” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “Saskatchewan has no authority to authorize permits without engaging with the Nation, and without providing the Nation the opportunity to provide input. Stay off our lands unless given consent by the First Nation. Our Inherent and Treaty Rights are paramount, and those permits were issued in breach of the Nations rights, if no consultation took place.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                  For immediate release: February , 23rd, 2021

 

Treaty No. 10 Gathering Response to Unauthorized Interference with Treaty No. 10 Traditional lands, including traplines at the Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s Traditional Territory

 

Treaty No. 10 Gathering supports Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s outrage that Saskatchewan would authorize access to Treaty No. 10 lands, amid a global pandemic, in such a way that puts the First Nation community, their traditional territories, traplines, and the dwindling caribou, lynx and other wildlife populations at risk.

 

Baselode Energy Corp. should be commended for confirming that the project will not proceed without the consent of the Birch Narrows First Nation. It seems that corporate partners have greater respect for the inherent and Treaty rights of Treaty No. 10 members than the Province of Saskatchewan.

 

Saskatchewan has been quoted as saying the Treaty No. 10 Nation, Birch Narrows, “had ample time to voice any concerns”. This is misleading, inaccurate and disingenuous.

 

Birch Narrows’ concerns were well known to Saskatchewan and to Baselode Energy Corp. and talks were underway with regard to the First Nation’s request for a Traditional Land Use assessment. Despite this, Saskatchewan completely disregarded the Nation’s position, issued exploration permits, and inexcusably failed to notify Birch Narrows of its decision. It was not until First Nation members discovered Baselode Energy Corp. workers in their treaty territory, that Birch Narrows became aware of the company’s activities and discovered the destruction of its members’ traplines.

While the Province’s consultation policy is outdated and inadequate, the exploration being conducted by Baselode Energy Corp. required, at a minimum, a Level 3 response under Saskatchewan’s Duty to Consult policy – i.e., written notice and offer to meet with the community to discuss the project and seek input. Saskatchewan had no interest in hearing any meaningful input from Birch Narrows and exerted unilateral control to deny Birch Narrows an opportunity to engage in appropriate consultation.

 

Saskatchewan’s position that a “traditional land-use study is not required by law” speaks for itself about the Province’s lack of respect or recognition of inherent and Treaty rights, not to mention its lack of regard for the basic interests of First Nation citizens in Saskatchewan.

 

Exploration activities are known to have disturbing effects on the wildlife, their habitats and to cause environmental degradation from their construction of access roads. Exploration activities on commonly used hunting and trapping grounds has a major impact on the lands and resources of the Dene people.

 

At a minimum, Saskatchewan is bound by its purported commitment to reconciliation. Building partnerships and respect based on Treaty rights is fundamental to developing reciprocal inter-governmental relationships.

 

We fully expect Saskatchewan to work with Birch Narrows and come to a mutually acceptable resolution to this discord.

With Bill C-15 on course to harmonize federal law with Indigenous rights, as recognized by the United Nations Declaration of Indigenous Rights (UNDRIP), Saskatchewan must work with the federal government and First Nation governments to rebuild a relationship based on trust, respect, and sharing, as originally intended by the Treaties.

 

 

 

 

 

British Columbia has already announced its commitment to implementing UNDRIP, and while more work is required to develop new relationships that take into account rights recognized by UNDRIP, progress is being made elsewhere in Canada. It is about time Saskatchewan caught up.

 

 

Please contact: 

 

 

Delia Opekokew

Barrister & Solicitor

Phone:  (416) 979-0597  Fax:  (416) 598-9520

Email: delia.opekokew@telus.net

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                   For immediate release: January 25rd, 2021

 

FSIN CALLS FOR FIRST NATIONS GOVERNOR GENERAL

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is calling on Canada to appoint the first ever First Nations Governor General.

“Now is the time for the first ever First Nations Governor General of Canada” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “When the newcomers came to these lands all those years ago, the first relationship the Queens’ subjects formed was with First Nations. As the representative of the Crown, it is important that we use this opportunity to honour the history of that relationship. The Nation building dream of Her Majesty’s (HRH) grandmother Queen Victoria and her heir King Edward VII must be honoured.

Having a member of the original Treaties that our grandmothers and grandfathers entered into, be our Majesty’s representative in what is now Canada will carry on the spirit and intent and honour of the Crown. We want in reinvigorate the role of the Governor General and the Crown relationship with our Inherent and Treaty Rights holders. This is a priority for the FSIN.”

A First Nations Governor General could heavily assist in the promotion of Canada from an Indigenous perspective, advocating a national identity while welcoming foreign dignitaries from other Nations with pride. The role of the Governor General acts as the Queen’s representative in Canada and is ceremonial, something that First Nations are very knowledgeable in. The role and responsibilities include parliamentary duties, reading the speech from the throne which outlines the government’s agenda. It also includes giving royal assent to bills passed by Parliament making them law. Lastly, summoning and dissolving Parliament.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf Cell : 306-291-6864

communications@fsin.com

larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                For immediate release: January 15th, 2021

 

FSIN CALLS FOR BETTER TREATMENT OF FIRST NATIONS PATIENTS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is alarmed after a number of calls were received regarding the poor and unprofessional treatment of two elderly First Nations patients at the Prince Albert Victoria Hospital over the last number of days.

 

“It is very disturbing and alarming to receive calls from concerned family members that have an elderly parent in the Prince Albert Victoria hospital.  We received a complaint that an 88-year-old man was receiving treatment in isolation and he doesn’t even speak English.  Where are his supports?” says FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt.  “We had another elderly woman’s family call to tell us that she was being mistreated by rude and unprofessional nurses.  She doesn’t want to be named because she’s scared that they’ll treat her worse in retaliation. These elderly patients need the help of translators and patient support services to understand what is happening to them and to be informed of the type of care they are receiving.”

 

“These are our elders and they deserve the utmost respect and fair treatment by all doctors and staff.  We are calling on the Province to step in and help these families and do something about all of the complaints that come in regarding First Nations patients at this hospital” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “This is why it is so important that we have our own First Nations doctors and nurses working within all hospitals throughout the province.  Our Chiefs have been calling for a First Nations hospital in this region for years and this is the exact reason why.  Our elderly patients are too scared to speak out against poor treatment or can’t speak out at all because no one speaks the same language as them.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                   For immediate release: December 18th, 2020

 

FIRST NATIONS MUST BE CONSULTED PRIOR TO CASINO CLOSURES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says it is imperative that First Nations are consulted by the Province prior to the implementation of public health orders that significantly impact and negatively affect First Nations communities and businesses.  All casinos in Saskatchewan are set to close Saturday and remain closed until January 15th.

 

“Our First Nations communities are the beneficiaries of the revenues generated by SIGA casinos operating across the Province and these closures are having substantial and potentially lasting impacts within the First Nations,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “SIGA understands the seriousness and importance of doing their part to combat the spread of COVID-19 and they have respected and followed provincial guidelines, going above and beyond to keep everyone safe.  Our casinos have some of the highest health and safety regulations for this reason.”

 

All SIGA casinos have been exemplary in ensuring safety of staff, patrons and the broader public.  SIGA implemented a strict ‘mandatory mask’ program in all of its’ casinos months before public health made them mandatory. In addition, SIGA has imposed rules that curtail all social interaction, including directional pathways and a reduced number of available slot machines, which are separated by appropriate spacing and Plexiglas dividers. These restrictions allow for more space for a limited number of patrons. Our SIGA casinos have proposed to operate at a very safe limit of 12% of facility capacity, in comparison to 25 or 50% limits placed on other enterprises in Saskatchewan.

 

“Our First Nations deserve fair and equitable treatment and opportunity as other businesses in the province,” says Chief Cameron. “Other gaming machines like VLTs which are hosted in Saskatchewan hotels, bars and restaurants remain open.  SIGA, and the 1,000 employees who are going to be out of work, simply seek a level playing field.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

-30-

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                          For immediate release: October 27, 2020

 

“Unity Prayer for Safety and Protection”

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive humbly ask our knowledge keepers all men, women and children, young and old of all denominations and cultures to join in prayerful solidarity in your First Nation community, schools, homes, etc on Friday, October 30, 2020. The “Unity Prayer for Safety and Protection”, at 9:00 a.m. we ask the entire Treaty Territory to pray for all those living in the shadow of the pandemic, those stricken with the coronavirus, and for the many who have died from COVID-19. Additionally, pray for protection and good health during the pandemic.

Whether it has to do with denominations, political feelings, race, socioeconomics, or other factors division within our treaty territory is not what God calls us to do. There are many ways we can disagree but unity praying in your own way as a whole should remain.
While many are working from home or staying home from school there will be times that you need to go out for necessities, we ask you to continue to practice your safety precautions. The many who remain working and in school please stay alert and take extra precautions to stay safe. At the moment, there is not cure for the coronavirus.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

In prayer, and Yours in the Spirit and intent of Treaty and reconciliation,

 

Chief Bobby Cameron
THE FEDERATION OF SOVEREIGN INDIGENOUS NATIONS

 

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: August 19, 2020

“FSIN DEMANDING CHANGES FROM HEALTH REGION

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive are demanding answers after a First Nations elder was subjected to poor treatment at the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert, which led to severe disfiguring burns on her body. 53-year-old Janette Sanderson, of the James Smith Cree Nation, went to the hospital on June 30th, 2020 for a broken ankle and was injected with an unknown substance while in the emergency room.

 

“The nurse told me it was potassium. She injected my arm and I told her it was burning and cried for her to stop. She kept going and ignored my pain” says Janette Sanderson. “They transported me to Saskatoon and after two weeks they sent me home. I was told when they discharged me from RUH that my arm would heal itself on July 15th. The home care nurses checked on it and it got worse. I went to another doctor in Melfort and they told me that it was a potassium burn and not a calcium burn, like suggested by the doctors in Prince Albert. We still don’t know what it was because the nurse didn’t keep the record.”

 

“We can not stand idly by while our First Nations elders are being treated poorly while trying to get medical care” says James Smith Cree Nation Chief Wally Burns. “Our people go to the hospital expecting proper care and to hear that Janette Sanderson was treated this way is inexcusable. Our elderly are the most vulnerable members of our communities and we have to stand up for them and protect them.”

 

“Our First Nations people have been subjected to poor treatment by health care workers and doctors for a number of years. This is why we need a health ombudsman to watch out for our First Nations people” says FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt. “The terrible stories of mistreatment while in the health care system by First Nations people have come forward in the past and it’s still continuing today. We need change and we need it now.”

 

“We will support this family, legally, politically and spiritually until this matter is resolved” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Our First Nations elders should never be scared to go to the hospital. They should be cared for and respected and we will do all that we can to make sure no other elders face this same treatment while in hospital.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

-30-

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                  For immediate release: July 7, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS TO END POLICE BRUTALITY OF FIRST NATIONS PEOPLES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands in support of Evan Penner, who recently went public with an allegation of a brutal assault in Saskatoon on July 4, 2020. The video released yesterday shows officers punching and tasering Penner. The FSIN Executive is calling on the Saskatoon Police Service (SPS) to immediately review and amend their use of force policies and bring an end to police brutality against First Nations people.

 

“We are still healing the relationship between the First Nations community and the Saskatoon Police following the Stonechild Inquiry. Incidents like this one continue to put a heavy strain on that relationship” says FSIN Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “While some recommendations were implemented from that inquiry, there are still instances of police brutality taking place at the hands of SPS members. This is why it is important to have an independent investigating body that looks into allegations of police brutality. We are encouraged to see that the Public Complaints Commission is doing this investigation. And although Minister Don Morgan’s recent amendments to the Police Act will bring forth greater transparency, the amendments still fall short of creating a civilian-led police oversight authority to investigate allegations of severe injury or death while at the hands of police. Due to the growing number of cases in recent years, the FSIN will continue to maintain its call for the creation of an independent civilian-led police oversight authority to investigate allegations of severe injury or deaths at the hands of police.”

 

Additionally, FSIN renews its calls for a Public Inquiry into the Systemic Discrimination in the Justice System.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

-30-

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS TREATY OBLIGATIONS BE HONOURED

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says the Federal Government must honour all First Nations Treaties and do the right thing for the First Nations of the Lake Huron and Lake Superior territories in Ontario. A judge has ruled in favor of the Federal and Ontario Governments settling a legal dispute involving the Robinson-Huron Treaty signed in 1850, which allowed for the settlement of First Nations land in exchange for a share of resource revenues in the region.

 

“Our Treaties have been upheld in court time and time again and yet the Government still challenges our Treaties, wasting taxpayers’ dollars needlessly” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Treaty Rights are constantly under attack by colonial laws that are incompatible with the spirit and intent of the Treaties to this day. This shouldn’t have to go as far as it has if the Crown was acting honourably. It’s time the Crown starts living up to their Treaty obligations and act honourably for all Treaty people in Canada. Treaty implementation must be a priority. We stand in full support and solidarity of the First Nations Chiefs, Councilors, Knowledge Keepers, women and youth calling for our Treaties to be honoured.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

-30-

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

SIGA CASINOS REOPENING JULY 9

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is pleased to learn of the reopening of the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) casinos in the province.

 

“The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented times for our First Nations communities, organizations and business, which have all been severely affected by this invisible enemy” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Our communities have felt the effects of the COVID-19 closures and restrictions to business but with the hard work of many behind the scenes, our casinos will once again reopen their doors to the public on July 9th. The staff and management of SIGA have been working tirelessly to ensure that all health and safety measures will be in place and strictly followed once the doors reopen.”

 

SIGA’s Health and Safety precautionary measures include:

 

· Markers are placed outside and inside the casino to encourage physical distancing

· All team members and guests must pass a pre-screening process prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests must sanitize their hands prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests are required to wear a mask or face shield

· Non-contact temperature checks may be administered

· Hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes are readily available for all guests

· High touch areas are cleaned frequently and deep cleans occur every night

· Slot machines are sanitized every hour and upon request

· Plexiglass barriers are installed at but not limited to our Players Club desk, Cage cashier windows, Delis

· Where possible, close contact and required touchpoints have been eliminated

· All team members have received training on Covid-19 safety protocols

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

-30-

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

SIGA CASINOS REOPENING JULY 9

 

The Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) has been steadily preparing for the reopening of its casinos across the province. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented times for our organization and business has been severely altered by this invisible enemy. Our communities have felt the effects of the COVID-19 closures and restrictions to business but with the hard work of many behind the scenes, our casinos will once again reopen their doors to the public on July 9th.

Information on the reopening can be found at: https://siga.ca/reopening-announcement/

 

SIGA’s Health and Safety precautionary measures include:

 

· Markers are placed outside and inside the casino to encourage physical distancing

· All team members and guests must pass a pre-screening process prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests must sanitize their hands prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests are required to wear a mask or face shield

· Non-contact temperature checks may be administered

· Hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes are readily available for all guests

· High touch areas are cleaned frequently and deep cleans occur every night

· Slot machines are sanitized every hour and upon request

· Plexiglass barriers are installed at but not limited to our Players Club desk, Cage cashier windows, Delis

· Where possible, close contact and required touchpoints have been eliminated

· All team members have received training on Covid-19 safety protocols

 

COVID 19 Update – Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 update can be obtained at the following website: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/cases-and-risk-of-covid-19-in-saskatchewan

FSIN COVID-19 Response Team at Covid@fsin.com 306-514-7494 Carey O’Soup, FSIN Director Emergency Management (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com Corey O’Soup, FSIN EM Coordinator (306) 220-0034 corey.osoup@fsin.com

 

– FSIN Executive

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 22, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS FOR C-92 IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING AS 1st ANNIVERSARY PASSES

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon, SK) — The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive calls on the Federal Government to invest in implementation of Act C-92 as the 1st anniversary of the bill receiving Royal Assent, June 21st, 2019, passes without funding.

 

“There is a disturbing irony that the first year anniversary of Act C-92 falls on both National Aboriginal Day and Father’s Day as another year passes without the promised change to the child welfare system in Canada,” said FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt. “Act C-92 was a promise Canada made to First Nations children for a better tomorrow. Now one year later, that promise remains broken.”

 

Act C-92 is intended to keep First Nations children and youth connected to their families and communities and under the authority and jurisdiction of First Nations. The Act requires that the best interests of each child be paramount and supports the transition to First Nations at a pace to be determine by each First Nation and their agencies. First Nations have the inherent and human right to jurisdiction over their children.

 

“Some First Nations are planning to move forward without funding announced while others are apprehensive without funding readily available as they could end up facing huge deficits,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “It is a huge risk and First Nations have been burned taking such risks before. They are being burned now. For example, First Nations and their agencies are being denied reimbursements for prevention funding that were deemed eligible the year prior. Canada keeps changing the rules leaving First Nations and their agencies holding the bag.”

 

Canada invested in prevention funding in response to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling that found Canada guilty of discriminating against First Nations children-in-care through deliberate underfunding. Prevention funding helps First Nations work with at-risk families to restore safe and thriving homes for children and youth breaking the cycle of issues caused by the residential school and the 60’scoop crises. Changes to the rules have left deficits in the millions in Saskatchewan.

 

“If you see most of a parent’s children dropping out of school, in jail or dying while in the care of that parent, not only would you question their parenting skills, you would also question their

motives,” says Vice Chief Pratt. “Canada, and the provinces, insert themselves as parent with all the legal and moral responsibility for each child apprehended. They are failing epically when it comes to First Nations children.”

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS IMMEDIATE FUNDING FOR FIRST NATIONS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says the Federal Government has failed to fully reimburse our First Nations for the prevention dollars they spent on COVID-19 supplies.

 

“Government has failed to do what it has promised in terms of Treaty and in terms of COVID reimbursements to our First Nations,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Many of our First Nations have spent their money with the guarantee that the Federal Government would reimburse them. This is still not happened for many of our nations who are now facing financial hardship and struggling to find financial resources to make up for the shortfall left by this Federal Government. The pestilence clause was written into Treaty to ensure that these situations would never arise. Yet, our First Nations have gone above and beyond to ensure the protection and safety of their communities with the promise of reimbursement from Government that never arrived. It’s time for the Federal Government to follow through with their Treaty obligations because it’s First Nations families that suffer while we wait.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS FOR MORE DETAILS ON POLICE OVERSIGHT BODY

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive demands more than promises from the details released yesterday regarding the future of an independent police oversight body. Any meaningful reform into police oversight must involve the ongoing participation of First Nations in Saskatchewan whose communities and members face disproportionate levels of harassment, violence and discrimination at the hands of police.

 

In the past six years alone, there has been approximately 7 deaths of First Nations individuals in Saskatchewan that involved police. Saskatchewan is also one of the only Provinces in Canada that lacks an independent oversight body to investigate the conduct of police in these deaths and other matters.

 

“It is an important first step forward that we have been asking for since the Neil Stonechild Inquiry. In this province, First Nations people, by and large, lack trust in police services that are also responsible for protecting and serving them,” says FSIN Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “An independent civilian-led body that investigates the conduct of police is an important step to rebuilding confidence and trust between our communities and the police. Public confidence can be rebuilt only with the active participation and consultation of First Nations people every step of the way.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

                                                                                              

 

FSIN COMMUNIQUÉ

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN PROCURES GFA AMENDMENTS WITH PROVINCE: $43+ MILLION GRANT AND 25% GAMING REVENUES

After 8 weeks of diligent work from a number of dedicated leaders, the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) has been approved for a $43.4 million non-repayable grant, which includes First Nations Trust revenues and CDC payments. These amendments to the Gaming Framework Agreement also includes a guarantee that our First Nations receive 25% of all SIGA gaming profits once the casinos reopen until April 2021.

The FSIN Executive would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to SIGA Chair Chief Reg Bellerose, FNT Chair Sheila Sutherland, Chief Marie-Anne Daywalker-Pelletier, Chief Darcy Bear, Tribal Chief Edmond Bellegarde, Tribal rep Neil Sasakamoose, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron, SIGA CEO Zane Hanson and FSIN EOO Dawn Walker for their hard work and diligence in securing this revenue stream for First Nations in Saskatchewan.

More details will be released on this positive news in the coming days as the deal is finalized.

FSIN COVID-19 UPDATE

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive and Emergency Management staff has begun delivering another round of Personal Protective Equipment to the 74 member First Nations and Tribal Councils. In addition, military grade handwashing stations are also being delivered to a number of nations to support gatherings for ceremony. Letters are being distributed to the communities outlining the amounts of PPE being delivered, which are pre-packaged based on a per capita basis.

 

Additional shipments will continue to be delivered in the coming months as stocks replenish. Every Chief will be directly contacted to arrange for pick-up and delivery. We continue to urge our nations to be vigilant and strict with their emergency preparedness measures, border security and/or curfews to prevent the spread of COVID-19. So far, the FSIN has distributed 753,000 barrier masks, 453,000 gloves, 50,000 medical gowns, 2000 face shields and limited amounts of hand sanitizer.

 

 

Important Notices

 

Local Food Infrastructure Fund: Applicant guide – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Applications will be accepted starting June 8th until December 31, 2023 (or an earlier date) based on funding availability. Applicants may submit a proposal for a minimum ask of $5,000 to a maximum ask of $250,000. Project activities must be completed by March 31, 2024. Indigenous applicants are eligible. https://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/agricultural-programs-and-services/local-food-infrastructure-fund/applicant-guide/?id=1563476002321

 

New Training Subsidy

The Re-Open Saskatchewan Training Subsidy (RSTS) program will reimburse eligible private-sector employers 100 per cent of employee training costs up to a maximum of $10,000 per business to mitigate against additional financial impacts from training required to support their safe re-opening. https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2020/june/18/temporary-training-program

 

Loan Application for First Nation Small Businesses

Application packages are available for First Nations small business owners through the Saskatchewan Indian Equity Foundation Inc. The emergency loan program is a component of the Indigenous Business Stabilization program. Maximum assistance is $40,000 comprised of a 75% loan and 25% non-repayable contribution. www.sief.sk.ca

 

Emergency Community Support Fund

Government of Canada announced a $350 million Emergency Community Support Fund organized through the Red Cross. The COVID-19 Emergency Support to Community Organizations is now open for applications. www.redcross.ca/communityorganizations

 

COVID 19 Update – Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 update can be obtained at the following website: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/cases-and-risk-of-covid-19-in-saskatchewan

FSIN COVID-19 Response Team at Covid@fsin.com 306-514-7494 Carey O’Soup, FSIN Director Emergency Management (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com Corey O’Soup, FSIN EM Coordinator (306) 220-0034 corey.osoup@fsin.com

 

– FSIN Executive

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 12, 2020

 

FSIN STANDS WITH CHIEF ALLAN ADAM

AND CALLS OUT SYSTEMIC RACISM WITHIN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands in support of Chief Allan Adam of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation in Alberta. Chief Adam recently went public with an allegation of brutal assault in Fort McMurray, Alberta on March 10, 2020. The RCMP dashcam video shows officers tackling and punching Chief Allan Adam during the incident.

“We have a dark history of racism within the police agencies in Saskatchewan. All areas of policing need a major overhaul before First Nations people feel safe and protected by the police, without a fear of violence or discrimination. For too long, First Nations people have been the targets of police violence and brutality,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “The RCMP and other police agencies need to look within themselves and acknowledge the existence of internalized systemic racism and make immediate changes how they interact with First Nations peoples. Violence and racism are not acceptable, and this type of behavior has existed for far too long. First Nations people have the right to feel safe in their communities and in public places, especially by those who are there to serve and protect.”

 

The FSIN renews its calls for an independent oversight committee tasked to investigate complaints against police and police conduct. The FSIN also renews calls for a Public Inquiry into the Systemic Discrimination in the Justice System that was made following the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, a white farmer who killed Colten Boushie, a member of the Red Pheasant First Nation on August 9, 2016.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 6, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS IMMEDIATE CHANGES TO JUSTICE SYSTEM

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands alongside and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in North America and sends sincere condolences to the family of George Floyd, who was killed by Minneapolis police on May 25th, 2020. Floyd’s death has sparked outrage and protests around the world.

“For generations, First Nations people have too been easily killed by police officers and other Canadian colonial systems and institutions. We stand together with the Black Lives Matter movement against our common enemy of racism and discrimination” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “There needs to be sweeping changes made to the current Canadian justice system so that our people are no longer killed on our Treaty lands and territories. We must return to a way of life that was governed by our own First Nations laws. Our elders have taught us that our own laws provided the structure and stability for individuals, family units and our nation as a whole.”

 

“Government has failed to implement many recommendations that would create real change within the justice system” says Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “We must see immediate changes within the justice system and that means the implementation of the recommendations from the countless inquiries and commissions including the Neil Stonechild Inquiry, UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, and Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls – Calls to Justice.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 4, 2020

 

WORK MUST CONTINUE ON MMIW NATIONAL ACTION PLAN

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive and Saskatchewan First Nations Women’s Commission (SFNWC) say the Federal Government decision to delay the National Action Plan is a dishonour to Saskatchewan First Nations’ women, girls and Two Spirt and gender-diverse people. The National Inquiry was set up to confront the roots causes and systemic issues, as well as the human rights violations against Canada’s most vulnerable group.

 

“First Nations women experience higher rates of violence and are more likely to be a target of violence, human trafficking, sexual exploitation, and assault. This wide-spread epidemic has persisted for hundreds of years and the root causes behind the violence needs to be addressed. A National Action Plan is urgently required to tackle the Inquiry’s Calls for Justice” says FSIN Vice Chief Heather Bear. “The issues that the Inquiry report brought to light did not stop when the world pandemic hit. In fact, the need for action has only been amplified. We have reports of First Nations women and families being turned away from emergency shelters because they are at capacity. We must continue with this important work so that people are not being left without adequate support. We expect our Treaty partner, the Federal Government, to find a way to support our efforts to coordinate a regional action plans during this time of COVID and social distancing.”

 

“Immediate support and coordination are necessary to change the status quo and that requires an unprecedented amount effort to challenge the institutional policies, systemic racism and sexism that are deeply rooted in Government structures,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “We call on Minister Bennett to work with our Women’s Commission to discuss a regional strategy. The answers are within our First Nations communities that have survived through generations of colonialism and adversity. We must keep this work moving forward for the protection of our women and children.”

 

Last year, the final report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls highlighted the high level of violence faced by our women, girls and LGBTQQIAA2S. It examined colonialism, racism and misogyny from both the historical context and to how it continues to manifest in today’s realities. The report recounted hundreds of personal testimonies of violence, as well as violations to culture, health, security, and rights to justice. The inquiry produced 231 Calls for Justice that tackle health, child welfare, justice, policing, cultural revival, education and public education action that centred a decolonizing and self-determining framework.

 

The SFNWC is the recognized political voice and advocate for restoring and revitalizing the significant roles First Nations women have in their homes, communities, and nations. SFNWC is comprised of 17 elected First Nations women Chiefs and 4 appointed Senators.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                                                                                   

 

FSIN JOINT MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 4, 2020

 

FSIN AND PASQUA FIRST NATION PARTNER TO PROCURE PPE FOR

SASKATCHEWAN FIRST NATIONS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN), Pasqua First Nation, and Pro Metal Industries Ltd have partnered to procure and provide Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Saskatchewan First Nations. A total of 444,000 gloves, 592,000 surgical face masks, 50,000 isolation gowns and 2,200 face shields were provided from Pro Metal Industries Ltd. to the FSIN for distribution last week. This PPE is intended for use by essential and front-line workers in our First Nation communities.

 

“Pasqua First Nation welcomes the opportunity to work with the Federal Government’s First Nation Indian Health Benefits (FNIHB), FSIN and ProMetal Industries in acquiring the much needed PPE for the FSIN’s 74 First Nations front line workers,” says Pasqua First Nation Chief MathewPeigan. “This PPE will assist in keeping those FN front line workers safe while keeping their own First Nation members safe during the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

 

“We are ensuring that every First Nation is properly prepared for the potential second or third waves of COVID-19. As Saskatchewan moves through their proposed reopen plan phases, we remind everyone that we must not let our guard down on our efforts of containing and preventing the spread of this invisible enemy,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “We urge all First Nations to continue to be vigilant with their emergency preparedness measures, border security and/or curfews. We are implementing the famine and pestilence clause under Treaty.”

 

This is the second round of PPE deliveries that the FSIN has made to Saskatchewan First Nations. The first round of deliveries included 155,000 barrier masks, 183,000 disposable gloves and hundreds of bottles of hand sanitizer. PPE was also delivered to the First Nations’ Child and Family Service agencies. The second round of deliveries will be complete this week.

 

Pro Metal Industries Ltd. is wholly owned by Pasqua First Nation’s PFN Group of Companies. Pro Metal Industries Ltd. is proud to support the FSIN and the 74 First Nations.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

 

 

FSIN JOINT MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.ca                                                                                                                                                  For immediate release: March 25th, 2021

 

FIRST NATIONS WILL RECEIVE COVID-19 VACCINES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) –The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive applauds the distribution of COVID-19 vaccines, which will now be available to First Nations throughout Saskatchewan through a  joint memorandum between Indigenous Services Canada (ISC), Saskatchewan Ministry of Health and the Northern Inter-Tribal Health Authority (NITHA). The vaccination program will provide direct allocation of the COVID-19 vaccines for an effective and culturally supportive vaccine campaign in First Nations communities.

“First Nations are in the highest risk category for the COVID-19 virus and our vaccinations should be top priority” says PAGC Grand Chief Brian Hardlotte. “This leverages existing First Nations vaccine distribution in Saskatchewan.   First Nations will receive 14 percent of the provincial Covid-19 vaccine dose allocations for distribution.”

“We’re happy to hear that our members will have access to the vaccine” says MLTC Tribal Chief Richard Ben.  “The COVID-19 variants are on the rise in Saskatchewan and have become a huge concern for our First Nation communities.  This will help ease some of the worries that our members currently face.”

“We’re breathing a sigh of relief with this announcement and welcome the news that all of our community members will have vaccines made available to them” says FSIN Vice-Chief David Pratt.  “This vaccine allocation will assist every First Nations member to the COVID-19 vaccine as they become eligible and that includes urban members as well.”

“We welcome the news that the COVID-19 vaccines will be allocated for First Nations, as we have a Treaty Right to Health through the Medicine Chest Clause” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “We have been advocating for First Nations to receive direct allocations of the COVID-19 vaccine. We will continue to strive for Treaty implementation during this world-wide pandemic, so that all First Nations are protected through the Famine and Pestilence Clause that is affirmed in our Treaties.”

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.ca                                                                                                                For immediate release: February , 23rd, 2021

 

FSIN PROVINVIAL PERMITS HAVE NO AUTHORITY ON

FIRST NATIONS LANDS 

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is calling on Baselode Energy Corporation to respect and honour Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s decision to cease and desist further resources exploration and vacate their lands.  A permit was issued by the Saskatchewan Government to Baselode on traditional lands that sit on the edge of the Athabascan Basin, which would interfere with the traditional practices of the Birch Narrows Dene Nation.  It is also home to the world’s richest uranium deposits.  

 

“Resource developers must understand that provincial permits don’t give them the green light to run rough shot over our Inherent and Treaty Rights” says Birch Narrows Dene Nation Chief Jonathan Sylvestre.  “First Nations must be meaningfully and properly engaged on issues that have the potential to adversely impact our rights.  It’s been especially difficult to meet deadlines during COVID- 19, while our efforts are keeping our communities safe – not on rubber stamping resource development activities in our territories.”

 

Birch Narrows Dene Nation initially set up a blockade but took it down and is now patrolling the area regularly.  The Nation expects meaningful and proper consultation prior to any resource development or extraction on their Treaty and traditional lands.

 

“The province needs to provide the already underfunded First Nations with the financial resources to be able to participate at the table in a meaningful way” said Meadow Lake Tribal Council Tribal Chief Richard Ben. “Otherwise, many First Nations will be left out of the process. We can’t undertake studies at our own expense in order to be consulted on resource development within our territory.”

 

“These kinds of bad business practices won’t be tolerated anymore as our connections to the land, water, animals and environment is paramount” says FSIN Vice Chief Heather Bear. “Resource exploration and extraction within our territories presents our Treaty hunters and gatherers with real problems, especially when it impacts their ability to exercise their Inherent and Treaty rights to hunt, fish, trap and gather.”

 

“This is Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s traditional land. Their Inherent and Treaty Rights override the provincial permitting process” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “Saskatchewan has no authority to authorize permits without engaging with the Nation, and without providing the Nation the opportunity to provide input. Stay off our lands unless given consent by the First Nation. Our Inherent and Treaty Rights are paramount, and those permits were issued in breach of the Nations rights, if no consultation took place.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                  For immediate release: February , 23rd, 2021

 

Treaty No. 10 Gathering Response to Unauthorized Interference with Treaty No. 10 Traditional lands, including traplines at the Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s Traditional Territory

 

Treaty No. 10 Gathering supports Birch Narrows Dene Nation’s outrage that Saskatchewan would authorize access to Treaty No. 10 lands, amid a global pandemic, in such a way that puts the First Nation community, their traditional territories, traplines, and the dwindling caribou, lynx and other wildlife populations at risk.

 

Baselode Energy Corp. should be commended for confirming that the project will not proceed without the consent of the Birch Narrows First Nation. It seems that corporate partners have greater respect for the inherent and Treaty rights of Treaty No. 10 members than the Province of Saskatchewan.

 

Saskatchewan has been quoted as saying the Treaty No. 10 Nation, Birch Narrows, “had ample time to voice any concerns”. This is misleading, inaccurate and disingenuous.

 

Birch Narrows’ concerns were well known to Saskatchewan and to Baselode Energy Corp. and talks were underway with regard to the First Nation’s request for a Traditional Land Use assessment. Despite this, Saskatchewan completely disregarded the Nation’s position, issued exploration permits, and inexcusably failed to notify Birch Narrows of its decision. It was not until First Nation members discovered Baselode Energy Corp. workers in their treaty territory, that Birch Narrows became aware of the company’s activities and discovered the destruction of its members’ traplines.

While the Province’s consultation policy is outdated and inadequate, the exploration being conducted by Baselode Energy Corp. required, at a minimum, a Level 3 response under Saskatchewan’s Duty to Consult policy – i.e., written notice and offer to meet with the community to discuss the project and seek input. Saskatchewan had no interest in hearing any meaningful input from Birch Narrows and exerted unilateral control to deny Birch Narrows an opportunity to engage in appropriate consultation.

 

Saskatchewan’s position that a “traditional land-use study is not required by law” speaks for itself about the Province’s lack of respect or recognition of inherent and Treaty rights, not to mention its lack of regard for the basic interests of First Nation citizens in Saskatchewan.

 

Exploration activities are known to have disturbing effects on the wildlife, their habitats and to cause environmental degradation from their construction of access roads. Exploration activities on commonly used hunting and trapping grounds has a major impact on the lands and resources of the Dene people.

 

At a minimum, Saskatchewan is bound by its purported commitment to reconciliation. Building partnerships and respect based on Treaty rights is fundamental to developing reciprocal inter-governmental relationships.

 

We fully expect Saskatchewan to work with Birch Narrows and come to a mutually acceptable resolution to this discord.

With Bill C-15 on course to harmonize federal law with Indigenous rights, as recognized by the United Nations Declaration of Indigenous Rights (UNDRIP), Saskatchewan must work with the federal government and First Nation governments to rebuild a relationship based on trust, respect, and sharing, as originally intended by the Treaties.

 

 

 

 

 

British Columbia has already announced its commitment to implementing UNDRIP, and while more work is required to develop new relationships that take into account rights recognized by UNDRIP, progress is being made elsewhere in Canada. It is about time Saskatchewan caught up.

 

 

Please contact: 

 

 

Delia Opekokew

Barrister & Solicitor

Phone:  (416) 979-0597  Fax:  (416) 598-9520

Email: delia.opekokew@telus.net

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                   For immediate release: January 25rd, 2021

 

FSIN CALLS FOR FIRST NATIONS GOVERNOR GENERAL

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is calling on Canada to appoint the first ever First Nations Governor General.

“Now is the time for the first ever First Nations Governor General of Canada” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “When the newcomers came to these lands all those years ago, the first relationship the Queens’ subjects formed was with First Nations. As the representative of the Crown, it is important that we use this opportunity to honour the history of that relationship. The Nation building dream of Her Majesty’s (HRH) grandmother Queen Victoria and her heir King Edward VII must be honoured.

Having a member of the original Treaties that our grandmothers and grandfathers entered into, be our Majesty’s representative in what is now Canada will carry on the spirit and intent and honour of the Crown. We want in reinvigorate the role of the Governor General and the Crown relationship with our Inherent and Treaty Rights holders. This is a priority for the FSIN.”

A First Nations Governor General could heavily assist in the promotion of Canada from an Indigenous perspective, advocating a national identity while welcoming foreign dignitaries from other Nations with pride. The role of the Governor General acts as the Queen’s representative in Canada and is ceremonial, something that First Nations are very knowledgeable in. The role and responsibilities include parliamentary duties, reading the speech from the throne which outlines the government’s agenda. It also includes giving royal assent to bills passed by Parliament making them law. Lastly, summoning and dissolving Parliament.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf Cell : 306-291-6864

communications@fsin.com

larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                For immediate release: January 15th, 2021

 

FSIN CALLS FOR BETTER TREATMENT OF FIRST NATIONS PATIENTS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is alarmed after a number of calls were received regarding the poor and unprofessional treatment of two elderly First Nations patients at the Prince Albert Victoria Hospital over the last number of days.

 

“It is very disturbing and alarming to receive calls from concerned family members that have an elderly parent in the Prince Albert Victoria hospital.  We received a complaint that an 88-year-old man was receiving treatment in isolation and he doesn’t even speak English.  Where are his supports?” says FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt.  “We had another elderly woman’s family call to tell us that she was being mistreated by rude and unprofessional nurses.  She doesn’t want to be named because she’s scared that they’ll treat her worse in retaliation. These elderly patients need the help of translators and patient support services to understand what is happening to them and to be informed of the type of care they are receiving.”

 

“These are our elders and they deserve the utmost respect and fair treatment by all doctors and staff.  We are calling on the Province to step in and help these families and do something about all of the complaints that come in regarding First Nations patients at this hospital” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “This is why it is so important that we have our own First Nations doctors and nurses working within all hospitals throughout the province.  Our Chiefs have been calling for a First Nations hospital in this region for years and this is the exact reason why.  Our elderly patients are too scared to speak out against poor treatment or can’t speak out at all because no one speaks the same language as them.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                   For immediate release: December 18th, 2020

 

FIRST NATIONS MUST BE CONSULTED PRIOR TO CASINO CLOSURES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says it is imperative that First Nations are consulted by the Province prior to the implementation of public health orders that significantly impact and negatively affect First Nations communities and businesses.  All casinos in Saskatchewan are set to close Saturday and remain closed until January 15th.

 

“Our First Nations communities are the beneficiaries of the revenues generated by SIGA casinos operating across the Province and these closures are having substantial and potentially lasting impacts within the First Nations,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “SIGA understands the seriousness and importance of doing their part to combat the spread of COVID-19 and they have respected and followed provincial guidelines, going above and beyond to keep everyone safe.  Our casinos have some of the highest health and safety regulations for this reason.”

 

All SIGA casinos have been exemplary in ensuring safety of staff, patrons and the broader public.  SIGA implemented a strict ‘mandatory mask’ program in all of its’ casinos months before public health made them mandatory. In addition, SIGA has imposed rules that curtail all social interaction, including directional pathways and a reduced number of available slot machines, which are separated by appropriate spacing and Plexiglas dividers. These restrictions allow for more space for a limited number of patrons. Our SIGA casinos have proposed to operate at a very safe limit of 12% of facility capacity, in comparison to 25 or 50% limits placed on other enterprises in Saskatchewan.

 

“Our First Nations deserve fair and equitable treatment and opportunity as other businesses in the province,” says Chief Cameron. “Other gaming machines like VLTs which are hosted in Saskatchewan hotels, bars and restaurants remain open.  SIGA, and the 1,000 employees who are going to be out of work, simply seek a level playing field.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More Information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

 

 

                                  

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                          For immediate release: October 27, 2020

 

“Unity Prayer for Safety and Protection”

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive humbly ask our knowledge keepers all men, women and children, young and old of all denominations and cultures to join in prayerful solidarity in your First Nation community, schools, homes, etc on Friday, October 30, 2020. The “Unity Prayer for Safety and Protection”, at 9:00 a.m. we ask the entire Treaty Territory to pray for all those living in the shadow of the pandemic, those stricken with the coronavirus, and for the many who have died from COVID-19. Additionally, pray for protection and good health during the pandemic.

Whether it has to do with denominations, political feelings, race, socioeconomics, or other factors division within our treaty territory is not what God calls us to do. There are many ways we can disagree but unity praying in your own way as a whole should remain.
While many are working from home or staying home from school there will be times that you need to go out for necessities, we ask you to continue to practice your safety precautions. The many who remain working and in school please stay alert and take extra precautions to stay safe. At the moment, there is not cure for the coronavirus.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

In prayer, and Yours in the Spirit and intent of Treaty and reconciliation,

 

Chief Bobby Cameron
THE FEDERATION OF SOVEREIGN INDIGENOUS NATIONS

 

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: August 19, 2020

“FSIN DEMANDING CHANGES FROM HEALTH REGION

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive are demanding answers after a First Nations elder was subjected to poor treatment at the Victoria Hospital in Prince Albert, which led to severe disfiguring burns on her body. 53-year-old Janette Sanderson, of the James Smith Cree Nation, went to the hospital on June 30th, 2020 for a broken ankle and was injected with an unknown substance while in the emergency room.

 

“The nurse told me it was potassium. She injected my arm and I told her it was burning and cried for her to stop. She kept going and ignored my pain” says Janette Sanderson. “They transported me to Saskatoon and after two weeks they sent me home. I was told when they discharged me from RUH that my arm would heal itself on July 15th. The home care nurses checked on it and it got worse. I went to another doctor in Melfort and they told me that it was a potassium burn and not a calcium burn, like suggested by the doctors in Prince Albert. We still don’t know what it was because the nurse didn’t keep the record.”

 

“We can not stand idly by while our First Nations elders are being treated poorly while trying to get medical care” says James Smith Cree Nation Chief Wally Burns. “Our people go to the hospital expecting proper care and to hear that Janette Sanderson was treated this way is inexcusable. Our elderly are the most vulnerable members of our communities and we have to stand up for them and protect them.”

 

“Our First Nations people have been subjected to poor treatment by health care workers and doctors for a number of years. This is why we need a health ombudsman to watch out for our First Nations people” says FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt. “The terrible stories of mistreatment while in the health care system by First Nations people have come forward in the past and it’s still continuing today. We need change and we need it now.”

 

“We will support this family, legally, politically and spiritually until this matter is resolved” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Our First Nations elders should never be scared to go to the hospital. They should be cared for and respected and we will do all that we can to make sure no other elders face this same treatment while in hospital.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                  For immediate release: July 7, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS TO END POLICE BRUTALITY OF FIRST NATIONS PEOPLES

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands in support of Evan Penner, who recently went public with an allegation of a brutal assault in Saskatoon on July 4, 2020. The video released yesterday shows officers punching and tasering Penner. The FSIN Executive is calling on the Saskatoon Police Service (SPS) to immediately review and amend their use of force policies and bring an end to police brutality against First Nations people.

 

“We are still healing the relationship between the First Nations community and the Saskatoon Police following the Stonechild Inquiry. Incidents like this one continue to put a heavy strain on that relationship” says FSIN Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “While some recommendations were implemented from that inquiry, there are still instances of police brutality taking place at the hands of SPS members. This is why it is important to have an independent investigating body that looks into allegations of police brutality. We are encouraged to see that the Public Complaints Commission is doing this investigation. And although Minister Don Morgan’s recent amendments to the Police Act will bring forth greater transparency, the amendments still fall short of creating a civilian-led police oversight authority to investigate allegations of severe injury or death while at the hands of police. Due to the growing number of cases in recent years, the FSIN will continue to maintain its call for the creation of an independent civilian-led police oversight authority to investigate allegations of severe injury or deaths at the hands of police.”

 

Additionally, FSIN renews its calls for a Public Inquiry into the Systemic Discrimination in the Justice System.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS TREATY OBLIGATIONS BE HONOURED

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says the Federal Government must honour all First Nations Treaties and do the right thing for the First Nations of the Lake Huron and Lake Superior territories in Ontario. A judge has ruled in favor of the Federal and Ontario Governments settling a legal dispute involving the Robinson-Huron Treaty signed in 1850, which allowed for the settlement of First Nations land in exchange for a share of resource revenues in the region.

 

“Our Treaties have been upheld in court time and time again and yet the Government still challenges our Treaties, wasting taxpayers’ dollars needlessly” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Treaty Rights are constantly under attack by colonial laws that are incompatible with the spirit and intent of the Treaties to this day. This shouldn’t have to go as far as it has if the Crown was acting honourably. It’s time the Crown starts living up to their Treaty obligations and act honourably for all Treaty people in Canada. Treaty implementation must be a priority. We stand in full support and solidarity of the First Nations Chiefs, Councilors, Knowledge Keepers, women and youth calling for our Treaties to be honoured.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

SIGA CASINOS REOPENING JULY 9

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is pleased to learn of the reopening of the Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) casinos in the province.

 

“The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented times for our First Nations communities, organizations and business, which have all been severely affected by this invisible enemy” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Our communities have felt the effects of the COVID-19 closures and restrictions to business but with the hard work of many behind the scenes, our casinos will once again reopen their doors to the public on July 9th. The staff and management of SIGA have been working tirelessly to ensure that all health and safety measures will be in place and strictly followed once the doors reopen.”

 

SIGA’s Health and Safety precautionary measures include:

 

· Markers are placed outside and inside the casino to encourage physical distancing

· All team members and guests must pass a pre-screening process prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests must sanitize their hands prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests are required to wear a mask or face shield

· Non-contact temperature checks may be administered

· Hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes are readily available for all guests

· High touch areas are cleaned frequently and deep cleans occur every night

· Slot machines are sanitized every hour and upon request

· Plexiglass barriers are installed at but not limited to our Players Club desk, Cage cashier windows, Delis

· Where possible, close contact and required touchpoints have been eliminated

· All team members have received training on Covid-19 safety protocols

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 30, 2020

 

SIGA CASINOS REOPENING JULY 9

 

The Saskatchewan Indian Gaming Authority (SIGA) has been steadily preparing for the reopening of its casinos across the province. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unprecedented times for our organization and business has been severely altered by this invisible enemy. Our communities have felt the effects of the COVID-19 closures and restrictions to business but with the hard work of many behind the scenes, our casinos will once again reopen their doors to the public on July 9th.

Information on the reopening can be found at: https://siga.ca/reopening-announcement/

 

SIGA’s Health and Safety precautionary measures include:

 

· Markers are placed outside and inside the casino to encourage physical distancing

· All team members and guests must pass a pre-screening process prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests must sanitize their hands prior to casino entry

· All team members and guests are required to wear a mask or face shield

· Non-contact temperature checks may be administered

· Hand sanitizer and disinfecting wipes are readily available for all guests

· High touch areas are cleaned frequently and deep cleans occur every night

· Slot machines are sanitized every hour and upon request

· Plexiglass barriers are installed at but not limited to our Players Club desk, Cage cashier windows, Delis

· Where possible, close contact and required touchpoints have been eliminated

· All team members have received training on Covid-19 safety protocols

 

COVID 19 Update – Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 update can be obtained at the following website: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/cases-and-risk-of-covid-19-in-saskatchewan

FSIN COVID-19 Response Team at Covid@fsin.com 306-514-7494 Carey O’Soup, FSIN Director Emergency Management (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com Corey O’Soup, FSIN EM Coordinator (306) 220-0034 corey.osoup@fsin.com

 

– FSIN Executive

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN Media Release

 

www.fsin.com                                                     For immediate release: June 22, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS FOR C-92 IMPLEMENTATION FUNDING AS 1st ANNIVERSARY PASSES

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon, SK) — The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive calls on the Federal Government to invest in implementation of Act C-92 as the 1st anniversary of the bill receiving Royal Assent, June 21st, 2019, passes without funding.

 

“There is a disturbing irony that the first year anniversary of Act C-92 falls on both National Aboriginal Day and Father’s Day as another year passes without the promised change to the child welfare system in Canada,” said FSIN Vice Chief David Pratt. “Act C-92 was a promise Canada made to First Nations children for a better tomorrow. Now one year later, that promise remains broken.”

 

Act C-92 is intended to keep First Nations children and youth connected to their families and communities and under the authority and jurisdiction of First Nations. The Act requires that the best interests of each child be paramount and supports the transition to First Nations at a pace to be determine by each First Nation and their agencies. First Nations have the inherent and human right to jurisdiction over their children.

 

“Some First Nations are planning to move forward without funding announced while others are apprehensive without funding readily available as they could end up facing huge deficits,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “It is a huge risk and First Nations have been burned taking such risks before. They are being burned now. For example, First Nations and their agencies are being denied reimbursements for prevention funding that were deemed eligible the year prior. Canada keeps changing the rules leaving First Nations and their agencies holding the bag.”

 

Canada invested in prevention funding in response to the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruling that found Canada guilty of discriminating against First Nations children-in-care through deliberate underfunding. Prevention funding helps First Nations work with at-risk families to restore safe and thriving homes for children and youth breaking the cycle of issues caused by the residential school and the 60’scoop crises. Changes to the rules have left deficits in the millions in Saskatchewan.

 

“If you see most of a parent’s children dropping out of school, in jail or dying while in the care of that parent, not only would you question their parenting skills, you would also question their

motives,” says Vice Chief Pratt. “Canada, and the provinces, insert themselves as parent with all the legal and moral responsibility for each child apprehended. They are failing epically when it comes to First Nations children.”

 

For more information or to coordinate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS IMMEDIATE FUNDING FOR FIRST NATIONS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says the Federal Government has failed to fully reimburse our First Nations for the prevention dollars they spent on COVID-19 supplies.

 

“Government has failed to do what it has promised in terms of Treaty and in terms of COVID reimbursements to our First Nations,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “Many of our First Nations have spent their money with the guarantee that the Federal Government would reimburse them. This is still not happened for many of our nations who are now facing financial hardship and struggling to find financial resources to make up for the shortfall left by this Federal Government. The pestilence clause was written into Treaty to ensure that these situations would never arise. Yet, our First Nations have gone above and beyond to ensure the protection and safety of their communities with the promise of reimbursement from Government that never arrived. It’s time for the Federal Government to follow through with their Treaty obligations because it’s First Nations families that suffer while we wait.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN CALLS FOR MORE DETAILS ON POLICE OVERSIGHT BODY

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive demands more than promises from the details released yesterday regarding the future of an independent police oversight body. Any meaningful reform into police oversight must involve the ongoing participation of First Nations in Saskatchewan whose communities and members face disproportionate levels of harassment, violence and discrimination at the hands of police.

 

In the past six years alone, there has been approximately 7 deaths of First Nations individuals in Saskatchewan that involved police. Saskatchewan is also one of the only Provinces in Canada that lacks an independent oversight body to investigate the conduct of police in these deaths and other matters.

 

“It is an important first step forward that we have been asking for since the Neil Stonechild Inquiry. In this province, First Nations people, by and large, lack trust in police services that are also responsible for protecting and serving them,” says FSIN Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “An independent civilian-led body that investigates the conduct of police is an important step to rebuilding confidence and trust between our communities and the police. Public confidence can be rebuilt only with the active participation and consultation of First Nations people every step of the way.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For more information, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

communications@fsin.com

                                                                                              

 

FSIN COMMUNIQUÉ

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 18, 2020

 

FSIN PROCURES GFA AMENDMENTS WITH PROVINCE: $43+ MILLION GRANT AND 25% GAMING REVENUES

After 8 weeks of diligent work from a number of dedicated leaders, the Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) has been approved for a $43.4 million non-repayable grant, which includes First Nations Trust revenues and CDC payments. These amendments to the Gaming Framework Agreement also includes a guarantee that our First Nations receive 25% of all SIGA gaming profits once the casinos reopen until April 2021.

The FSIN Executive would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to SIGA Chair Chief Reg Bellerose, FNT Chair Sheila Sutherland, Chief Marie-Anne Daywalker-Pelletier, Chief Darcy Bear, Tribal Chief Edmond Bellegarde, Tribal rep Neil Sasakamoose, FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron, SIGA CEO Zane Hanson and FSIN EOO Dawn Walker for their hard work and diligence in securing this revenue stream for First Nations in Saskatchewan.

More details will be released on this positive news in the coming days as the deal is finalized.

FSIN COVID-19 UPDATE

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive and Emergency Management staff has begun delivering another round of Personal Protective Equipment to the 74 member First Nations and Tribal Councils. In addition, military grade handwashing stations are also being delivered to a number of nations to support gatherings for ceremony. Letters are being distributed to the communities outlining the amounts of PPE being delivered, which are pre-packaged based on a per capita basis.

 

Additional shipments will continue to be delivered in the coming months as stocks replenish. Every Chief will be directly contacted to arrange for pick-up and delivery. We continue to urge our nations to be vigilant and strict with their emergency preparedness measures, border security and/or curfews to prevent the spread of COVID-19. So far, the FSIN has distributed 753,000 barrier masks, 453,000 gloves, 50,000 medical gowns, 2000 face shields and limited amounts of hand sanitizer.

 

 

Important Notices

 

Local Food Infrastructure Fund: Applicant guide – Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC)

Applications will be accepted starting June 8th until December 31, 2023 (or an earlier date) based on funding availability. Applicants may submit a proposal for a minimum ask of $5,000 to a maximum ask of $250,000. Project activities must be completed by March 31, 2024. Indigenous applicants are eligible. https://www.agr.gc.ca/eng/agricultural-programs-and-services/local-food-infrastructure-fund/applicant-guide/?id=1563476002321

 

New Training Subsidy

The Re-Open Saskatchewan Training Subsidy (RSTS) program will reimburse eligible private-sector employers 100 per cent of employee training costs up to a maximum of $10,000 per business to mitigate against additional financial impacts from training required to support their safe re-opening. https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/news-and-media/2020/june/18/temporary-training-program

 

Loan Application for First Nation Small Businesses

Application packages are available for First Nations small business owners through the Saskatchewan Indian Equity Foundation Inc. The emergency loan program is a component of the Indigenous Business Stabilization program. Maximum assistance is $40,000 comprised of a 75% loan and 25% non-repayable contribution. www.sief.sk.ca

 

Emergency Community Support Fund

Government of Canada announced a $350 million Emergency Community Support Fund organized through the Red Cross. The COVID-19 Emergency Support to Community Organizations is now open for applications. www.redcross.ca/communityorganizations

 

COVID 19 Update – Saskatchewan

Saskatchewan’s COVID-19 update can be obtained at the following website: https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/cases-and-risk-of-covid-19-in-saskatchewan

FSIN COVID-19 Response Team at Covid@fsin.com 306-514-7494 Carey O’Soup, FSIN Director Emergency Management (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com Corey O’Soup, FSIN EM Coordinator (306) 220-0034 corey.osoup@fsin.com

 

– FSIN Executive

 

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 12, 2020

 

FSIN STANDS WITH CHIEF ALLAN ADAM

AND CALLS OUT SYSTEMIC RACISM WITHIN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands in support of Chief Allan Adam of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation in Alberta. Chief Adam recently went public with an allegation of brutal assault in Fort McMurray, Alberta on March 10, 2020. The RCMP dashcam video shows officers tackling and punching Chief Allan Adam during the incident.

“We have a dark history of racism within the police agencies in Saskatchewan. All areas of policing need a major overhaul before First Nations people feel safe and protected by the police, without a fear of violence or discrimination. For too long, First Nations people have been the targets of police violence and brutality,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “The RCMP and other police agencies need to look within themselves and acknowledge the existence of internalized systemic racism and make immediate changes how they interact with First Nations peoples. Violence and racism are not acceptable, and this type of behavior has existed for far too long. First Nations people have the right to feel safe in their communities and in public places, especially by those who are there to serve and protect.”

 

The FSIN renews its calls for an independent oversight committee tasked to investigate complaints against police and police conduct. The FSIN also renews calls for a Public Inquiry into the Systemic Discrimination in the Justice System that was made following the acquittal of Gerald Stanley, a white farmer who killed Colten Boushie, a member of the Red Pheasant First Nation on August 9, 2016.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 6, 2020

 

FSIN DEMANDS IMMEDIATE CHANGES TO JUSTICE SYSTEM

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive stands alongside and in support of the Black Lives Matter movement in North America and sends sincere condolences to the family of George Floyd, who was killed by Minneapolis police on May 25th, 2020. Floyd’s death has sparked outrage and protests around the world.

“For generations, First Nations people have too been easily killed by police officers and other Canadian colonial systems and institutions. We stand together with the Black Lives Matter movement against our common enemy of racism and discrimination” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “There needs to be sweeping changes made to the current Canadian justice system so that our people are no longer killed on our Treaty lands and territories. We must return to a way of life that was governed by our own First Nations laws. Our elders have taught us that our own laws provided the structure and stability for individuals, family units and our nation as a whole.”

 

“Government has failed to implement many recommendations that would create real change within the justice system” says Vice Chief Dutch Lerat. “We must see immediate changes within the justice system and that means the implementation of the recommendations from the countless inquiries and commissions including the Neil Stonechild Inquiry, UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, and Reclaiming Power and Place: The Final Report of the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls – Calls to Justice.”

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                              

 

FSIN MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 4, 2020

 

WORK MUST CONTINUE ON MMIW NATIONAL ACTION PLAN

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive and Saskatchewan First Nations Women’s Commission (SFNWC) say the Federal Government decision to delay the National Action Plan is a dishonour to Saskatchewan First Nations’ women, girls and Two Spirt and gender-diverse people. The National Inquiry was set up to confront the roots causes and systemic issues, as well as the human rights violations against Canada’s most vulnerable group.

 

“First Nations women experience higher rates of violence and are more likely to be a target of violence, human trafficking, sexual exploitation, and assault. This wide-spread epidemic has persisted for hundreds of years and the root causes behind the violence needs to be addressed. A National Action Plan is urgently required to tackle the Inquiry’s Calls for Justice” says FSIN Vice Chief Heather Bear. “The issues that the Inquiry report brought to light did not stop when the world pandemic hit. In fact, the need for action has only been amplified. We have reports of First Nations women and families being turned away from emergency shelters because they are at capacity. We must continue with this important work so that people are not being left without adequate support. We expect our Treaty partner, the Federal Government, to find a way to support our efforts to coordinate a regional action plans during this time of COVID and social distancing.”

 

“Immediate support and coordination are necessary to change the status quo and that requires an unprecedented amount effort to challenge the institutional policies, systemic racism and sexism that are deeply rooted in Government structures,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “We call on Minister Bennett to work with our Women’s Commission to discuss a regional strategy. The answers are within our First Nations communities that have survived through generations of colonialism and adversity. We must keep this work moving forward for the protection of our women and children.”

 

Last year, the final report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls highlighted the high level of violence faced by our women, girls and LGBTQQIAA2S. It examined colonialism, racism and misogyny from both the historical context and to how it continues to manifest in today’s realities. The report recounted hundreds of personal testimonies of violence, as well as violations to culture, health, security, and rights to justice. The inquiry produced 231 Calls for Justice that tackle health, child welfare, justice, policing, cultural revival, education and public education action that centred a decolonizing and self-determining framework.

 

The SFNWC is the recognized political voice and advocate for restoring and revitalizing the significant roles First Nations women have in their homes, communities, and nations. SFNWC is comprised of 17 elected First Nations women Chiefs and 4 appointed Senators.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

                                                                                                                                                   

 

FSIN JOINT MEDIA RELEASE

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                     June 4, 2020

 

FSIN AND PASQUA FIRST NATION PARTNER TO PROCURE PPE FOR

SASKATCHEWAN FIRST NATIONS

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN), Pasqua First Nation, and Pro Metal Industries Ltd have partnered to procure and provide Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for Saskatchewan First Nations. A total of 444,000 gloves, 592,000 surgical face masks, 50,000 isolation gowns and 2,200 face shields were provided from Pro Metal Industries Ltd. to the FSIN for distribution last week. This PPE is intended for use by essential and front-line workers in our First Nation communities.

 

“Pasqua First Nation welcomes the opportunity to work with the Federal Government’s First Nation Indian Health Benefits (FNIHB), FSIN and ProMetal Industries in acquiring the much needed PPE for the FSIN’s 74 First Nations front line workers,” says Pasqua First Nation Chief MathewPeigan. “This PPE will assist in keeping those FN front line workers safe while keeping their own First Nation members safe during the COVID-19 Pandemic.”

 

“We are ensuring that every First Nation is properly prepared for the potential second or third waves of COVID-19. As Saskatchewan moves through their proposed reopen plan phases, we remind everyone that we must not let our guard down on our efforts of containing and preventing the spread of this invisible enemy,” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron. “We urge all First Nations to continue to be vigilant with their emergency preparedness measures, border security and/or curfews. We are implementing the famine and pestilence clause under Treaty.”

 

This is the second round of PPE deliveries that the FSIN has made to Saskatchewan First Nations. The first round of deliveries included 155,000 barrier masks, 183,000 disposable gloves and hundreds of bottles of hand sanitizer. PPE was also delivered to the First Nations’ Child and Family Service agencies. The second round of deliveries will be complete this week.

 

Pro Metal Industries Ltd. is wholly owned by Pasqua First Nation’s PFN Group of Companies. Pro Metal Industries Ltd. is proud to support the FSIN and the 74 First Nations.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More information or to cooridate interviews, please contact:

FSIN Communications

Larissa Burnouf

Cell: 306-291-6864

File Name: COVID-19-FSIN-Bulletin-April-14-2020.docx

File Name: COVID-19-FSIN-Bulletin-April-14-2020.docx

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                                        April 6, 2020

FSIN RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FIRST NATIONS TO PREVENT THE SPREAD OF COVID 19:

COVID 19 is a viral illness with serious implications for everyone, but, especially for people with underlying health conditions (asthma, and other chronic respiratory illness, diabetes, disability, heart disease, high blood pressure, heart attack or stroke, liver diseases, severe obesity, and those with histories of substance abuse), compromised immune systems (due to conditions such as bone marrow or organ transplantation, poorly controlled HIV or AIDS, cancer treatment, and smoking), and the elderly.

 

We can stay ahead of the curve by implementing social and physical distancing. But what does that mean?

 1. Shelter in Place – this means staying home. Only leave your home for food, water or medical supplies and try to limit this to one designated person in your household ONCE a week.

2. Sanitation Habits – if you leave your home and go into town, the band office or any place where the general public has access, ensure to wash your hands with soap and water, use hand sanitizer, and remove your clothes and shoes and sanitize/wash them before you come into contact with anyone in your home. A mixture of bleach and water is helpful in killing the virus. Also, daily wash down all common surfaces such as doorknobs, light switches and counters.

3. Barrier Masks – Whenever you are going into public, wear a barrier mask. Remember the mask does not make you invincible! Masks alone will not prevent infection but when you must go out in public to get groceries or attend medical appointments, cloth masks can provide some degree of extra protection when used along with physical and social distancing, proper and frequent handwashing and avoiding touching one’s face. If you do not have an N95 mask (the current highest rated type of mask,) the Center for Disease Control (CDC) has developed a video on how to make masks at home. However, once you have your mask on – do not adjust it or touch it for any reason. When you return home, dispose of it or wash it immediately. https://www.cdc.gov/…/prevent…/diy-cloth-face-coverings.html   

4. Physical Distancing – when you are in contact with people outside your home, keep a two (2) metres distance between yourselves and them.

5. Quarantining Within your Home: If you or a family member is infected, implement the two (2) metres distancing rule. Wear a mask whenever you are providing them with food or water. Monitor their fevers. If they have difficulty breathing, call an ambulance. Call 811, your emergency management response team and other help lines if you need help in assessing or monitoring your own or your family member’s health.

Carey O’Soup, Emergency Management Coordinator (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com 

Myrtle Morin, Chief’s Office Intergovernmental Affairs (306) 250-1931 myrtle.morin@fsin.com

 

Respectfully, 

FSIN Executive 

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                             April 5, 2020

 

FSIN COMMUNIQUÉ

www.fsin.com April 5th, 2020
Covid-19 on Saskatchewan First Nations

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive has confirmed 3 cases of Covid-19 in First Nations communities in Saskatchewan. James Smith Cree Nation is the latest to confirm a case of Covid-19 within their community. Southend and Onion Lake are two other communities in the province that have also confirmed cases. If your community has a presumptive or confirmed cases of Covid-19, please contact our Emergency Response Team at covid@fsin.com as soon as possible.

The FSIN has been working with Pasqua First Nation Chief Todd Peigan to secure a shipment of Personal Protection Equipment (PPE) from an international supplier. We are currently awaiting confirmation on a large shipment for nations that are needing PPE urgently. We are available to work with your community to establish a direct link.

The FSIN Executive and Emergency Management Response Team have obtained the following information for you use. Should your community need medical shelters, ProMetal Industries can provide Blu-Med NPI shelter systems. These shelters are for 10 people and have 3 different filtration systems. Shelters are $154,031 plus shipping and the company will deliver to your community, set up and train your staff to use. Please contact Paul Heebner at Pro Metal Industries Ltd in Regina, Saskatchewan at 306-519-7350 or www.prometal.ca.

The following is an update from the Government of Saskatchewan:
https://www.saskatchewan.ca/government/health-care-administration-and-provider-resources/treatment-procedures-and-guidelines/emerging-public-health-issues/2019-novel-coronavirus/cases-and-risk-of-covid-19-in-saskatchewan

The Government of Canada announced support to those experiencing homelessness and women fleeing violence during the Covid-19 pandemic. Information can be found at the following:
https://www.canada.ca/en/employment-social-development/news/2020/04/canada-announces-support-to-those-experiencing-homelessness-and-women-fleeing-gender-based-violence-during-the-coronavirus-disease-covid-19-pandemic.html?fbclid=IwAR0cZGaIY5tWhnCYXUEio2TLrCZNyY7qb40RSEqiNnVy0IRpY-xMIPkAU3Y

The Red Earth Cree Nation has graciously supplied their ERP Border Security Plan template for your reference. Please contact Charlene Head for more information at Charlene.head@icloud.com for more information.

Please share the FSIN toll-free information and referral line poster with your community members. The lines are staffed daily from 9am – 9pm.

We are working hard to address and fight this invisible enemy. We all must do our part and work together to flatten the curve and stop the spread of Covid-19. Let’s pray together, stay in our homes and care for our most vulnerable. We must protect our elderly and keep our children, grandchildren and great grandchildren safe and healthy. Please encourage every member of you community to stay safe and healthy. We are urging all nations to remain calm and do all that we can to prepare and take extra precautions. We also recommend that our communities continue to practice traditional customs, pray, smudge and do everything to protect our most vulnerable.
– FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.

Carey O’Soup, Emergency Management Coordinator (306) 601-9204 carey.osoup@fsin.com
Myrtle Morin, Chief’s Office Intergovernmental Affairs (306) 250-1931 myrtle.morin@fsin.com

Respectfully,
FSIN Executive

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                             March 26, 2020

 

FSIN Calls for Immediate Suspensions of All Evictions and Utility Shutoffs

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive continues to receive complaints from concerned citizens across the province that are still being threatened by landlords for evictions and having their utilities, such as water, being cut off.  This comes as other leaders in the province made similar calls and were denied.

 

“There are many First Nations people that are being put into dangerous situations during a time of global pandemic.  These landlords and utility officers are putting many lives at risk by evicting or shutting off utilities, including the children who live in these homes” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “Everyone is in a state of worry dealing with Covid-19 uncertainty; these families don’t need the added stress and anxiety of having their locks changed or having their water shut off. Canada has announced support for individuals and families, but these landlords are still delivering eviction notices and utilities are still being suspended.  This needs to stop immediately.  Lives are at stake and that takes priority over rent or utility payments.”

 

The FSIN Executive also wants to express serious concern regarding the lack of cooperation of members of the public when it comes to the Federal and Provincial advisories of self-isolation and staying home during this time.


“We cannot state this enough.  Stay home.  Take all recommendations and advisories regarding Covid-19 seriously.  Limit all of your interactions to contain the spread of this virus and flatten the curve” says Chief Cameron.  “We urge our communities to remain calm and to also take all necessary precautions and implement pandemic response measures to keep their communities safe.  If you have been ordered or recommended to self-isolate, then do just that.  Don’t go out shopping.  Don’t go visit family or friends. Stay home and wash your hands frequently with soap and water.”

 

The FSIN is taking all steps to ensure the safety of Saskatchewan First Nations by working remotely and making regular public announcements and distributing advisories to the 74 member nations.  Our Executive and staff continue to take part in daily conference calls with the Federal and Provincial counterparts.  We continue to operate the FSIN’s Emergency Operations Center and staffed an Emergency Response Team, that has coordinated the launch of a toll-free Covid-19 information and referral line. 

As a pre-emptive measure, the FSIN has taken steps to address Supply-Chain Issues by mass ordering basic grocery and sanitary supplies for our First Nation citizens of the province.  The distribution of these goods will be done with the support of Tribal Councils and First Nations in the major urban centres in Saskatchewan to ensure that off-reserve members are also receiving necessities as required.

 

The FSIN has developed a general inquiries email for anyone to contact our Emergency Management team.  The email is covid@fsin.com. They can also be reached at 306-514-7494.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More Information, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
communications@fsin.com

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                             March 26, 2020

FSIN says First Nations Community Support Fund is Good Start

But First Nations Require More

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive says First Nations Community Support Fund is a good start, but we require more.  We urge Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and the Federal Government to immediately increase the amounts allocated in the Support Fund announced today to the 74 member First Nations in Saskatchewan.

 

“The $30 million allocated in this fund is a good start, however our 74 First Nations will require greater investment. Given that many of our bands currently already operate in a state of deficit from decades of chronic underfunding, we continue to face some extreme challenges within our Treaty territories” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “It is unrealistic to believe that this investment will be enough for these nations to work through the strain that Covid-19 pandemic response has created.  This $30 million will be depleted in a matter of days and needs to be immediately increased based on the realistic needs of all of our communities, including the off-reserve membership.”

 

The FSIN has developed a general inquiries email for anyone to contact our Emergency Management team.  The email is covid@fsin.com. They can also be reached at 306-514-7494.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More Information, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
communications@fsin.com

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                             March 26, 2020

FSIN Launches Toll-Free COVID-19 Information Line

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) is launching a toll-free COVID-19 information line for First Nations people in Saskatchewan.  The toll-free number is 1-877-626-6448 and will be staffed daily from 9:00 am – 9:00 pm CST.

 

The toll-free line is strictly for information, referrals and resources regarding COVID-19 and is not for legal or medical advice or counselling services, however, referrals to these would be provided should they be requested or needed by the caller. This toll-free line is not for medical emergencies.

 

“There has been some misinformation that has been going around regarding COVID-19 and the steps that need to be taken if someone believes they may have contracted the virus” says FSIN Chief Bobby Cameron.  “This toll-free line will help alleviate some of the strain that is being felt on the provincial information lines running today and help our people get the information they need during this pandemic.  It will also provide an opportunity for our callers to ask questions and helps us find out where their biggest concerns are regarding COVID-19, so we can help and offer the best support to our nations.  This line will not replace, but supplement, important information on the COVID-19 pandemic being released daily by the province.  Once this line is running effectively, it is a priority to be able to offer our callers information in our languages.”

 

FSIN Executive and staff are continuing to work remotely, 7 days a week, to communicate necessary information to our 74 member First Nations and ensure the health and safety of First Nations people in Saskatchewan.  The FSIN has developed a general inquiries email for anyone to contact our Emergency Management team.  The email is covid@fsin.com and is now active.

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More Information, please contact:
FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
communications@fsin.com

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                             March 12, 2020

 

FSIN Takes Precautionary Measures to Restrict Potential Covid-19 Cases

 

(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive is taking all precautionary measures to curb and restrict the potential spread of Coronavirus, Covid-19, in our region and communities.  With confirmed cases of Covid-19 now in Saskatoon, the FSIN Executive met with Health officials, the Indian Government Commission and Joint Executive Council today, to confirm the postponement of all FSIN-related sporting events, gatherings, conferences and forum until further notice.

 

The FSIN Executive also strongly demands that Federal and Provincial counterparts ensure that the 74 Member First Nations are given high priority for health services and potential anti-viral vaccines and that health and emergency management investments are increased in advance of the strain medical facilities will surely endure and are allocated directly to the First Nations.

 

The FSIN Executive has been taking part in regular national health meetings with national leadership and health officials to ensure that our information is up to date and our nations are informed and taking all precautionary measures necessary to prevent cases of Covid-19.

 

Regular communications and information notices have been dispersed to all Saskatchewan First Nations leadership and posted on social media.  FSIN Health and Emergency Management staff are working closely with the Regional Medical Health Office and continue to report on the situation daily.  Many Saskatchewan First Nations and Tribal councils have access to or have previously implemented their own pandemic plan for these types of situations.

 

The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations represents 74 First Nations in Saskatchewan. The Federation is committed to honouring the spirit and intent of the Treaties, as well as the promotion, protection and implementation of the Treaty promises that were made more than a century ago.

 

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For More Information, please contact:

FSIN Communications
Larissa Burnouf
Cell : 306-291-6864
communications@fsin.com
larissa.burnouf@fsin.com

                                                                                              

 

FSIN COMMUNIQUÉ

 

www.fsin.com                                                                                                                                                                      March 12, 2020

 

Coronavirus (Covid-19) Update


(Treaty 6 Territory, Saskatoon SK) – The Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations (FSIN) Executive, following a motion passed today by the Indian Government Commission and Joint Executive Council, will immediately implement precautionary measures in the best interests of protecting our most vulnerable community members from Covid-19. 

 

Until further notice, all FSIN-related sporting events, gatherings, conferences and forums are postponed.  A skeleton staff of essential services will remain at the FSIN offices to ensure operations continue, however the majority of FSIN staff will be taking annual leave or working from home. 


The Executive will continue to notify your communities as this pandemic progesses.